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Charles Sauriol Conservation Reserve

Sights & Sites: Andrew Strachan

Andrew Strachan

Andrew is past President of Friends of the Don East, has run as a Green Party candidate in three elections, and works as a copywriter at a major international advertising agency.

I asked him the question: What is the most interesting, unusual or beautiful sight to see in one of our ravines or forests?"

"I’ve always enjoyed my hikes and bikes in Charles Sauriol Conservation Reserve, and usually enter from the north end off Lawrence Avenue East. It became a different experience a few years ago when they put a paved pathway through it, but I still enjoy it just as always. The stormwater pond overlook is a great place to hang out and see what wildlife is about. It’s also a different experience in each of the four seasons. And once you go around that first sharp bend, you leave the highway sounds behind and enter a place where you would never know the city was all around you.

I’ve always been a railfan and a fan of industrial architecture. One of my favourite sights on the trail is the large Canadian Pacific rail bridge. It’s the CP freight mainline and is the same track that crosses Yonge Street at the Summerhill LCBO. The fascinating thing about the bridge is that it is actually two bridges. Once up close you can see that there is an older bridge and a newer one. The main giveaway is the footings. The older bridge has round footings made of stone blocks while the newer one has concrete footings. The newer bridge also has a more robust trackbed made of much thicker steel. Together, these bridges are a wonderful puzzle of rusted steel that looks marvelous from any vantage."

Photos at the top of this post courtesy of Andrew Strachan.

Posted on: July 20, 2015
This post is part of Sights & Sites, a series that celebrates our amazing ravines & forests and the people who care for them.